(IN SPANISH) 2021: Integrating Neurofeedback into Trauma Therapy: Insights from a Qualitative Study

(IN SPANISH)
Abstract:
Trauma has been found to have a significant impact on the brain. This is particularly true when trauma occurs during developmental years (Thomason & Marusak, 2017). Due to the increasing body of research demonstrating these impacts, neuroscience-informed approaches have been encouraged when working with trauma survivors in a mental health context (Ross et al., 2017). One approach that more directly addresses the functioning of the brain is neurofeedback. Some studies have found evidence for neurofeedback as an effective treatment for symptoms related to trauma (e.g., Frick, Curtis, Rainey, Li, & Simpson, 2018; van der Kolk et al., 2016). As a result, some trauma therapists have decided to integrate neurofeedback into their practices. The process of integrating neurofeedback into trauma therapy presents several challenges, including learning to use the necessary technology, gaining an understanding of brain anatomy and functions, and introducing neurofeedback into the therapeutic relationship (Weiner, 2016).
Therapists who choose to add neurofeedback to their practice typically lack a background of extensive education in brain science and technology, and therefore there can be a steep learning curve (Hamlin, 2018; Weiner, 2016). In addition to requiring additional education, integrating neurofeedback into trauma therapy creates a shift in the therapeutic relationship. Fisher (2014), a psychotherapist specializing in trauma who integrated neurofeedback into her therapy practice, wrote about the process of introducing this modality into her work with clients. Other than Fisher’s (2014) guidance on how to introduce clients to neurofeedback, there is minimal literature on the process of integrating neurofeedback into trauma therapy. Some other neurofeedback providers have written about the integration of neurofeedback into clinical practice (e.g., Hamlin, 2018; Weiner, 2016), but these do not address the specific challenges that come with treating trauma survivors.
This 60-minute standing presentation focuses on results from a qualitative phenomenological study on trauma therapists’ experiences with integrating neurofeedback into therapy for complex/developmental trauma. The study focused on practical and relational aspects of integration. This presentation aims to provide participants with background information on the use of neurofeedback in the treatment of trauma and provide insights into the process of integrating with a focus on relational aspects. At the time of this proposal the analysis process of the study is still in progress, but it will be completed by the end of May 2021. In order to gain a deeper understanding of participants’ experiences, the proposed research design used interpretative phenomenological analysis ([IPA], Smith, 1996). Data were collected using a demographic survey and semi-structured interviews, and analysis was conducted using IPA.
Presented by: Anney Lyons

$30.00

(IN SPANISH)
Abstract:
Trauma has been found to have a significant impact on the brain. This is particularly true when trauma occurs during developmental years (Thomason & Marusak, 2017). Due to the increasing body of research demonstrating these impacts, neuroscience-informed approaches have been encouraged when working with trauma survivors in a mental health context (Ross et al., 2017). One approach that more directly addresses the functioning of the brain is neurofeedback. Some studies have found evidence for neurofeedback as an effective treatment for symptoms related to trauma (e.g., Frick, Curtis, Rainey, Li, & Simpson, 2018; van der Kolk et al., 2016). As a result, some trauma therapists have decided to integrate neurofeedback into their practices. The process of integrating neurofeedback into trauma therapy presents several challenges, including learning to use the necessary technology, gaining an understanding of brain anatomy and functions, and introducing neurofeedback into the therapeutic relationship (Weiner, 2016).
Therapists who choose to add neurofeedback to their practice typically lack a background of extensive education in brain science and technology, and therefore there can be a steep learning curve (Hamlin, 2018; Weiner, 2016). In addition to requiring additional education, integrating neurofeedback into trauma therapy creates a shift in the therapeutic relationship. Fisher (2014), a psychotherapist specializing in trauma who integrated neurofeedback into her therapy practice, wrote about the process of introducing this modality into her work with clients. Other than Fisher’s (2014) guidance on how to introduce clients to neurofeedback, there is minimal literature on the process of integrating neurofeedback into trauma therapy. Some other neurofeedback providers have written about the integration of neurofeedback into clinical practice (e.g., Hamlin, 2018; Weiner, 2016), but these do not address the specific challenges that come with treating trauma survivors.
This 60-minute standing presentation focuses on results from a qualitative phenomenological study on trauma therapists’ experiences with integrating neurofeedback into therapy for complex/developmental trauma. The study focused on practical and relational aspects of integration. This presentation aims to provide participants with background information on the use of neurofeedback in the treatment of trauma and provide insights into the process of integrating with a focus on relational aspects. At the time of this proposal the analysis process of the study is still in progress, but it will be completed by the end of May 2021. In order to gain a deeper understanding of participants’ experiences, the proposed research design used interpretative phenomenological analysis ([IPA], Smith, 1996). Data were collected using a demographic survey and semi-structured interviews, and analysis was conducted using IPA.
Presented by: Anney Lyons

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(IN SPANISH) 2021: Integrating Neurofeedback into Trauma Therapy: Insights from a Qualitative Study
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