2021: Integrating Clinical Hypnosis and Neurofeedback

Abstract:
The conceptual foundation of this workshop is predicated on the seminal work of Peniston and Kulkosky in the 1980s and 1990s. These clinicians utilized alpha theta neurofeedback with hospitalized Vets with a primary focus on ETOH abuse. The results obtained were significant. The “Peniston” protocol also utilized goal-directed positive imagery (hypnosis) for abstention and to resolve PTSD symptoms. Neurophysiological research has identified how the theta state is a prominent (if not a principle) mechanism in the hypnotic process.
Over the following years, a number of practitioners have combined NFB with cognitive tasks (Thompson & Thompson, Tinius), visual tasks (Nash) and with integrating hypnotic suggestions (Hammond). The basic conceptual rationale for integrating hypnosis and NFB is based upon the prerequisite to provide the client (trainee) with clear, specific, goal-oriented procedures. NFB shapes more relaxed, responsive and adaptive neural responsivity to the press of both our own internal world and the external environment. Providing our clients with goal-oriented instructions (and specific ideas) to utilize this more attuned brain state is a desirable step. Additionally, pre- NFB hypnosis reduces the impact of noise (artifact) in acquisition phases and in training phases. There are many cases where one may utilize a combination of hypnosis and NFB. For example, teaching a client with anxiety or insomnia, or someone with headaches, the use of self-hypnosis as a self-management skill [may enhance responsiveness and diminish symptoms]. Clients with conditions such as fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue often benefit from hypnosis training following or during NFB. Hypnosis may support greater engagement in the training process, and the provision of a short inter-session goal directed hypnosis recorded practice reinforces outcome.
Research has supported the use of adjunctive methods to strengthen the outcome of NFB and to provide the tools for the integration of desired skills in a more regulated brain.
Clinical hypnosis has a long clinical and research history and when utilized as an adjunctive method with NFB, it is hypothesized to enhance clinical outcomes.

Presented by: Steve Warner

Category:

$60.00

Abstract:
The conceptual foundation of this workshop is predicated on the seminal work of Peniston and Kulkosky in the 1980s and 1990s. These clinicians utilized alpha theta neurofeedback with hospitalized Vets with a primary focus on ETOH abuse. The results obtained were significant. The “Peniston” protocol also utilized goal-directed positive imagery (hypnosis) for abstention and to resolve PTSD symptoms. Neurophysiological research has identified how the theta state is a prominent (if not a principle) mechanism in the hypnotic process.
Over the following years, a number of practitioners have combined NFB with cognitive tasks (Thompson & Thompson, Tinius), visual tasks (Nash) and with integrating hypnotic suggestions (Hammond). The basic conceptual rationale for integrating hypnosis and NFB is based upon the prerequisite to provide the client (trainee) with clear, specific, goal-oriented procedures. NFB shapes more relaxed, responsive and adaptive neural responsivity to the press of both our own internal world and the external environment. Providing our clients with goal-oriented instructions (and specific ideas) to utilize this more attuned brain state is a desirable step. Additionally, pre- NFB hypnosis reduces the impact of noise (artifact) in acquisition phases and in training phases. There are many cases where one may utilize a combination of hypnosis and NFB. For example, teaching a client with anxiety or insomnia, or someone with headaches, the use of self-hypnosis as a self-management skill [may enhance responsiveness and diminish symptoms]. Clients with conditions such as fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue often benefit from hypnosis training following or during NFB. Hypnosis may support greater engagement in the training process, and the provision of a short inter-session goal directed hypnosis recorded practice reinforces outcome.
Research has supported the use of adjunctive methods to strengthen the outcome of NFB and to provide the tools for the integration of desired skills in a more regulated brain.
Clinical hypnosis has a long clinical and research history and when utilized as an adjunctive method with NFB, it is hypothesized to enhance clinical outcomes.

Presented by: Steve Warner

We’ve Moved…

To accommodate the organization’s growing needs, we have decided to move our office to a new location.

2146 Roswell Road

Suite 108, PMB 736

Marietta, GA 30062

USA

2021: Integrating Clinical Hypnosis and Neurofeedback
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