2021: How Immunity, Epigenetics and Inflammation Impact Neuromodulation: What Clinicians Need to Know

Abstract:
As clinical neuromodulation becomes more informed by systemic biology, discussion around connections between mind and brain and body have evolved to include the critical roles of the central nervous system, neuroendocrine hormones, and immune response (Eskandari, 2006). Strategies recommended by clinical service providers for handling stress have expanded beyond the realm of cognitive and emotional management, and have begun to encompass everything from sleep hygiene to breathing exercises to biofeedback technology (Firth, 2019).

The current political, economic and healthcare landscape are undergoing significant changes, and clinical professionals may find themselves increasingly challenged to help clients better navigate a complex and unstable environment in the pursuit of well-being (Kiecolt-Glaser, 2010). Since 2000, researchers have produced a growing framework of observational and biological evidence suggesting that the body’s defensive immune response, rather than the infection itself, may be what damages the brain. Further, chronic stress may activate a harmful immune response, even in the absence of infection. (Dantzer,2008).

If the central nervous system has the capacity of influencing how the immune system functions, the interplay between immunity, community and perception is a necessary part of a thorough assessment before beginning with neuromodulation techniques. Expanded strategies for finding new ways of building community and filtering overwhelming stimuli are critical for developing resilience.

This presentation will offer a basic understanding of the immune system through the life cycle (Ledford, 2017), and present emerging research currently shaping the conversation around how neuropsychiatric conditions are affected by inflammation, infection and injury (Jacka, 2010).
Resources will be introduced to support clinicians as they update their intake procedures to help determine when the client is in a post acute syndrome stage and can benefit from neurotherapy, and when it’s better to refer out for additional medical evaluation. Practical suggestions will be provided to help with both educating the clients and providing more comprehensive treatment plans, and the developing role of teletherapy and therapeutic technologies will be highlighted as options and recommendations are discussed.

Presented by: Penijean Gracefire & Alexandra Linardakis

Category:

$60.00

Abstract:
As clinical neuromodulation becomes more informed by systemic biology, discussion around connections between mind and brain and body have evolved to include the critical roles of the central nervous system, neuroendocrine hormones, and immune response (Eskandari, 2006). Strategies recommended by clinical service providers for handling stress have expanded beyond the realm of cognitive and emotional management, and have begun to encompass everything from sleep hygiene to breathing exercises to biofeedback technology (Firth, 2019).

The current political, economic and healthcare landscape are undergoing significant changes, and clinical professionals may find themselves increasingly challenged to help clients better navigate a complex and unstable environment in the pursuit of well-being (Kiecolt-Glaser, 2010). Since 2000, researchers have produced a growing framework of observational and biological evidence suggesting that the body’s defensive immune response, rather than the infection itself, may be what damages the brain. Further, chronic stress may activate a harmful immune response, even in the absence of infection. (Dantzer,2008).

If the central nervous system has the capacity of influencing how the immune system functions, the interplay between immunity, community and perception is a necessary part of a thorough assessment before beginning with neuromodulation techniques. Expanded strategies for finding new ways of building community and filtering overwhelming stimuli are critical for developing resilience.

This presentation will offer a basic understanding of the immune system through the life cycle (Ledford, 2017), and present emerging research currently shaping the conversation around how neuropsychiatric conditions are affected by inflammation, infection and injury (Jacka, 2010).
Resources will be introduced to support clinicians as they update their intake procedures to help determine when the client is in a post acute syndrome stage and can benefit from neurotherapy, and when it’s better to refer out for additional medical evaluation. Practical suggestions will be provided to help with both educating the clients and providing more comprehensive treatment plans, and the developing role of teletherapy and therapeutic technologies will be highlighted as options and recommendations are discussed.

Presented by: Penijean Gracefire & Alexandra Linardakis

We’ve Moved…

To accommodate the organization’s growing needs, we have decided to move our office to a new location.

2146 Roswell Road

Suite 108, PMB 736

Marietta, GA 30062

USA

2021: How Immunity, Epigenetics and Inflammation Impact Neuromodulation: What Clinicians Need to Know
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