2021: Good Vibrations (Plenary)

Abstract:
This presentation is an EEG Spectral analysis of passive listening to Native American Flute pentatonic scales, plus a review of audioanalgesia healing literature. In the last twenty years, this area of science has exploded with research related to the effect of sound and music on brain functions, Trimble, M., & Hesdorffer, D. (2017), Pantev, Oostenvel, Engelien, Ross, Roberts & Hoke, (1998), Peretz & Zatorre, (2005), Zatorre, (2007). Non-invasive procedures have allowed science to observe the areas of the brain which are activated by music and has shown that music activates more areas of the brain than nearly any other stimuli. At the same time, quantum physics has explored the theory that everything is made of vibrations. The theory suggests that solid matter is really an illusion and that everything vibrates or “resonates” at a particular frequency, including human cells (McTaggart, L. (2001).

Some consider music a gateway to the awakening of the spiritual, because, again, frequency is an activator of the brain, Kunkkullaya, K. U. (2020), (Riley, L. (2000). This is one of the reasons chanting and toning have traditionally been used in every major religion of the world to enhance prayerful, meditative, super-aware states of mind. When a person is in a relaxed state, beta-endorphins are produced, which promote healing.
When this state is brought on by exposure to music, the result is called “audioanalgesia”. Music’s healing effects are described as three-fold: emotional, spiritual, and physical, Cvetkovic, D. & Cosic, I. (2011).

Music comprises pitch, timbre, vibrato, intensity, beat tracking, tempo or velocity, contour or intonation, rhythm variation or timing, and melody and harmonic features, all of which can drive and entrain neural, respiratory and cardiac activity, Goss, C. and Miller, E. B. (2014), Miller, E.B. & Goss. C.F. (2014), Miller, E.B. & Goss. C.F. (2015).

This presentation explores the interface of captured brain activity and the implied emotional/spiritual realm of “healing” as defined by the metaphysical literature, Riley, L. 2000). Metaphysical healing is not necessarily curing; it is an aspect of the spirit, while curing is an alteration of the body. One can experience healing without curing, but some research suggests that curing rarely occurs without prior healing. This presentation examines the results of participants passive listening to different octaves of solo Native American pentatonic flute music, including:
1. a comparison between a “baseline” period of silent relaxation and brain response to flute music.
2. a comparison between the first half and the second half of the five-minute period of flute listening, and
3. a comparison between the periods of listening to lower-pitched flute compared to higher-pitched flute. The presentation will also provide live examples of shifts in brain wave patterns suggested for:
1. Pre-operation calming protocols
2. Post-operation protocols to promote alertness,
3. Pain relief relaxation progression, and
4. Near death music recommendations.

Presented by: Ronald Bonnstetter

Category:

$30.00

Abstract:
This presentation is an EEG Spectral analysis of passive listening to Native American Flute pentatonic scales, plus a review of audioanalgesia healing literature. In the last twenty years, this area of science has exploded with research related to the effect of sound and music on brain functions, Trimble, M., & Hesdorffer, D. (2017), Pantev, Oostenvel, Engelien, Ross, Roberts & Hoke, (1998), Peretz & Zatorre, (2005), Zatorre, (2007). Non-invasive procedures have allowed science to observe the areas of the brain which are activated by music and has shown that music activates more areas of the brain than nearly any other stimuli. At the same time, quantum physics has explored the theory that everything is made of vibrations. The theory suggests that solid matter is really an illusion and that everything vibrates or “resonates” at a particular frequency, including human cells (McTaggart, L. (2001).

Some consider music a gateway to the awakening of the spiritual, because, again, frequency is an activator of the brain, Kunkkullaya, K. U. (2020), (Riley, L. (2000). This is one of the reasons chanting and toning have traditionally been used in every major religion of the world to enhance prayerful, meditative, super-aware states of mind. When a person is in a relaxed state, beta-endorphins are produced, which promote healing.
When this state is brought on by exposure to music, the result is called “audioanalgesia”. Music’s healing effects are described as three-fold: emotional, spiritual, and physical, Cvetkovic, D. & Cosic, I. (2011).

Music comprises pitch, timbre, vibrato, intensity, beat tracking, tempo or velocity, contour or intonation, rhythm variation or timing, and melody and harmonic features, all of which can drive and entrain neural, respiratory and cardiac activity, Goss, C. and Miller, E. B. (2014), Miller, E.B. & Goss. C.F. (2014), Miller, E.B. & Goss. C.F. (2015).

This presentation explores the interface of captured brain activity and the implied emotional/spiritual realm of “healing” as defined by the metaphysical literature, Riley, L. 2000). Metaphysical healing is not necessarily curing; it is an aspect of the spirit, while curing is an alteration of the body. One can experience healing without curing, but some research suggests that curing rarely occurs without prior healing. This presentation examines the results of participants passive listening to different octaves of solo Native American pentatonic flute music, including:
1. a comparison between a “baseline” period of silent relaxation and brain response to flute music.
2. a comparison between the first half and the second half of the five-minute period of flute listening, and
3. a comparison between the periods of listening to lower-pitched flute compared to higher-pitched flute. The presentation will also provide live examples of shifts in brain wave patterns suggested for:
1. Pre-operation calming protocols
2. Post-operation protocols to promote alertness,
3. Pain relief relaxation progression, and
4. Near death music recommendations.

Presented by: Ronald Bonnstetter

We’ve Moved…

To accommodate the organization’s growing needs, we have decided to move our office to a new location.

2146 Roswell Road

Suite 108, PMB 736

Marietta, GA 30062

USA

2021: Good Vibrations (Plenary)
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