2020: SLORETA the Alpha Rhythm and the Default Mode Network-Clinical Implications in QEEG and Neurofeedback (Plenary)

Presented by Harry Kerasidis, MD: The concept of large-scale brain networks has evolved over the last 3 decades through convergence of methods which include fMRI, PET, SPECT, EEG and MEG. Task positive networks such as the Salience Network, the Dorsal Attention Network, and the Executive Function Network have been elucidated. Raichel described the “Default Mode” Network (DMN) in 2001 to describe the resting state activation/task inhibition of functionally connected regions of the brain. Since this time research has focused on the function of this network. The DMN has been found to be most active when the mind is at rest. The DMN is also active when the individual is thinking about others, thinking about themselves, remembering the past, and future planning. Berger’s first descriptions of the human electroencephalogram (EEG) in the 1920’s included the state reactivity. The reactivity of the Alpha Rhythm (AR) was further described by Walter in the 1940’s. The AR was described as a posteriorly dominant activity with maximal amplitude with the eyes closed and the mind at rest and reduced in amplitude with mental activity and visual analysis. In the 1968 Kamiya published his seminal studies on operant conditioning of the AR and effects on consciousness. In the early 1990’s, Pascual-Marqui developed an analysis algorithm, solving the inverse problem of identifying 3-dimensional source localization of EEG activity from scalp surface sensor recordings. With evolution of computer digital analysis techniques, and revisions of head modeling, this technology has evolved to the capability of higher resolution, real-time imaging of the 3-dimensional EEG source localization and statistical comparison to normative databases.This presentation reviews the application of sLORETA imaging of the AR in real time, through Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and with database comparisons when the alpha rhythm frequency varies from the norm. Fast-alpha variants and encephalopathic slowing of the alpha rhythm will be demonstrated. Comparisons to other imaging modalities of the DMN will be demonstrated. Implications of sLORETA AR QEEG analysis will be discussed.

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$30.00

Presented by Harry Kerasidis, MD: The concept of large-scale brain networks has evolved over the last 3 decades through convergence of methods which include fMRI, PET, SPECT, EEG and MEG. Task positive networks such as the Salience Network, the Dorsal Attention Network, and the Executive Function Network have been elucidated. Raichel described the “Default Mode” Network (DMN) in 2001 to describe the resting state activation/task inhibition of functionally connected regions of the brain. Since this time research has focused on the function of this network. The DMN has been found to be most active when the mind is at rest. The DMN is also active when the individual is thinking about others, thinking about themselves, remembering the past, and future planning. Berger’s first descriptions of the human electroencephalogram (EEG) in the 1920’s included the state reactivity. The reactivity of the Alpha Rhythm (AR) was further described by Walter in the 1940’s. The AR was described as a posteriorly dominant activity with maximal amplitude with the eyes closed and the mind at rest and reduced in amplitude with mental activity and visual analysis. In the 1968 Kamiya published his seminal studies on operant conditioning of the AR and effects on consciousness. In the early 1990’s, Pascual-Marqui developed an analysis algorithm, solving the inverse problem of identifying 3-dimensional source localization of EEG activity from scalp surface sensor recordings. With evolution of computer digital analysis techniques, and revisions of head modeling, this technology has evolved to the capability of higher resolution, real-time imaging of the 3-dimensional EEG source localization and statistical comparison to normative databases.This presentation reviews the application of sLORETA imaging of the AR in real time, through Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and with database comparisons when the alpha rhythm frequency varies from the norm. Fast-alpha variants and encephalopathic slowing of the alpha rhythm will be demonstrated. Comparisons to other imaging modalities of the DMN will be demonstrated. Implications of sLORETA AR QEEG analysis will be discussed.

We’ve Moved…

To accommodate the organization’s growing needs, we have decided to move our office to a new location.

2146 Rosewell RoadSuite

Suite 108, PMB 736

Marietta, GA 30062

USA

2020: SLORETA the Alpha Rhythm and the Default Mode Network-Clinical Implications in QEEG and Neurofeedback (Plenary)
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