2020: Neurofeedback Treatment for Institutionalized Children and Adolescents Exposed to Trauma

Presented by Ania Justo, PhD, MD: Children raised in institutions are considered an extreme example of social deprivation and they have a significantly increased risk of a range of emotional and behavioral disorders (Bos et al., 2011; Hampson et al., 2016). Thus, early life adversity may contribute to appear mental health problems and to shape brain development (Albaek, Kinn, & Milde, 2018; Gillies et al., 2016). Neurofeedback training aims to enhance self-regulation of neural activities (Carrobles, 2016) and this technique is a promising alternative approach to ameliorate trauma symptoms. Due to the variety of clinical manifestations that can appear in this population, the neurofeedback protocol could focus on the alpha, beta, delta, theta, and gamma treatment or a combination of them (Becerra et al., 2006).

A pilot study has been conducted to verify the effectiveness of Neurofeedback treatments in the population of institutionalized children. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy of personalized NF training (QEEG) in a group of institutionalized children to check the effect on social and behavioral skills, and in their improvement in academic performance. In this workshop, we will analyze the data of the participants, (6 girls and 5 boys with range age between 5-14 years): an initial qEEG (pretreatment), the previous medical record and the neuropsychological assessment. In this context, a neurofeedback treatment proposed in each case. We did 40 NFB sessions (using different protocols according to each children’s electroencephalographic pattern), and we realized the postreatment evaluation with the same instruments than pretreatment (qEEG and neuropsychological test). We found changes in the pre and post treatment qEEG which will be discussed in this workshop. Correspondingly, a reduction in emotional and behavioral alterations was observed. As well as changes in the execution of tasks as an improvement in sustained attention. However, cautious interpretation is warranted due to the small sample.

Category:

$60.00

Presented by Ania Justo, PhD, MD: Children raised in institutions are considered an extreme example of social deprivation and they have a significantly increased risk of a range of emotional and behavioral disorders (Bos et al., 2011; Hampson et al., 2016). Thus, early life adversity may contribute to appear mental health problems and to shape brain development (Albaek, Kinn, & Milde, 2018; Gillies et al., 2016). Neurofeedback training aims to enhance self-regulation of neural activities (Carrobles, 2016) and this technique is a promising alternative approach to ameliorate trauma symptoms. Due to the variety of clinical manifestations that can appear in this population, the neurofeedback protocol could focus on the alpha, beta, delta, theta, and gamma treatment or a combination of them (Becerra et al., 2006).

A pilot study has been conducted to verify the effectiveness of Neurofeedback treatments in the population of institutionalized children. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy of personalized NF training (QEEG) in a group of institutionalized children to check the effect on social and behavioral skills, and in their improvement in academic performance. In this workshop, we will analyze the data of the participants, (6 girls and 5 boys with range age between 5-14 years): an initial qEEG (pretreatment), the previous medical record and the neuropsychological assessment. In this context, a neurofeedback treatment proposed in each case. We did 40 NFB sessions (using different protocols according to each children’s electroencephalographic pattern), and we realized the postreatment evaluation with the same instruments than pretreatment (qEEG and neuropsychological test). We found changes in the pre and post treatment qEEG which will be discussed in this workshop. Correspondingly, a reduction in emotional and behavioral alterations was observed. As well as changes in the execution of tasks as an improvement in sustained attention. However, cautious interpretation is warranted due to the small sample.

We’ve Moved…

To accommodate the organization’s growing needs, we have decided to move our office to a new location.

2146 Roswell Road

Suite 108, PMB 736

Marietta, GA 30062

USA

2020: Neurofeedback Treatment for Institutionalized Children and Adolescents Exposed to Trauma
Scroll to Top

Are you having problems clicking next on the membership form?

You must have 3rd party cookies set to “Always Accept.”

Internet Explorer 7 on Windows

  • Click the “Tools” menu
  • Click “Internet Options”
  • Select the “Privacy” tab
  • Option 1: To enable third-party cookies for all sites
  • Click “Advanced”
  • Select “Override automatic cookie handling”
  • Select the “Accept” button under “Third-party Cookies” and click “OK”

Firefox 3 on Windows

  • Click the “Tools” menu
  • Click “Options…”
  • Select the “Privacy” menu
  • Make sure “Keep until” is set to “they expire”
  • Option 1: To enable third party cookies for ALL sites: Make sure “Accept third-party cookies” is checked

Safari on Apple OS X:

  • Click the “Safari” menu
  • Click “Preferences…”
  • Click the “Security” menu
  • For “Cookies and website data” unselect “Block all cookies”
  • For “Website tracking”, unselect “Prevent cross-site tracking”
Safari enable cookies for membership purchase.

Firefox 3 on Apple OS X:

  • Click the “Firefox” menu
  • Click Preferences…
  • Click the Privacy menu
  • Make sure “Keep until” is set to “they expire”
  • Option 1: To enable third-party cookies for ALL sites: Make sure “Accept third-party cookies” is checked

Google Chrome on Windows

  • Select the Wrench (spanner) icon at the top right
  • Select “Options”
  • Select the “Under the Hood” tab
  • Select “Allow all cookies” under “Cookie Settings” and click “Close”

Internet Explorer 6 on Windows

  • Click the “Tools” menu
  • Click “Internet Options”
  • Select the “Privacy” tab
  • Move the settings slider to “Low” or “Accept all cookies”
  • Click “OK”

Opera 9 on Windows

  • Click the “Tools” menu
  • Click “Preferences…”
  • Click the “Advanced” tab
  • Select “Cookies” on the left list
  • Make sure “Accept cookies” is selected and uncheck “Delete new cookies when exiting Opera”
  • Click “OK”