2020: Neurofeedback Regulation for Trauma Treatment (Plenary)

Presented by Javier Elcarte: Since Penniston & Kulkosky (1991), when they used their alpha/theta training to treat Vietnam veterans with combat-related PSTD, NFB has been a useful tool for PTSD for many years now. In recent years, authors like Bessel Van del Kolk (Frontiers of Trauma Treatment 2013) have introduced the use of NFB not only with NFB but also with Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD). So, in this lecture, we will focus more in the Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD) than in Stress Post-Traumatic Disorder (SPTD).
Children and adults exposed to chronic interpersonal traumas present psychological disorders that are not included in the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The brain organizes itself through generated oscillatory rhythms, which is where its plasticity is based. Fear is our basic emotion, cause of the rupture of that rhythm of the brain and origin of trauma. If we do not access directly the circuits of that fear, trauma will be tremendously resistant to treatment. Our goal, in this case, with NFB is to increase the brain’s “window of tolerance” when facing stress. In this way, we get a mature brain ready for psychological intervention with appropriate therapies for trauma treatment.

Twenty years of experience combining neurofeedback training with other regulations means like mindfulness have proved to be the perfect ground preparation for a further trauma body centered therapy like EMDR.

Bessel A. Van der Kolk with his study on EEG neurofeedback training (NF), in patients with chronic PTSD to explore the capacity of NF to reduce PTSD symptoms and increase affect regulation capacities. And Sebern Fisher with her book: Neurofeedback in the Treatment of Developmental Trauma: Calming the Fear-Driven Brain, give detailed example in how neurofeedback regulation facilitates the path to severe trauma recovery. Optimizing brain’s response to trauma triggers is the best way to psychotherapy to approach sever trauma injures.

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$30.00

Presented by Javier Elcarte: Since Penniston & Kulkosky (1991), when they used their alpha/theta training to treat Vietnam veterans with combat-related PSTD, NFB has been a useful tool for PTSD for many years now. In recent years, authors like Bessel Van del Kolk (Frontiers of Trauma Treatment 2013) have introduced the use of NFB not only with NFB but also with Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD). So, in this lecture, we will focus more in the Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD) than in Stress Post-Traumatic Disorder (SPTD).
Children and adults exposed to chronic interpersonal traumas present psychological disorders that are not included in the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The brain organizes itself through generated oscillatory rhythms, which is where its plasticity is based. Fear is our basic emotion, cause of the rupture of that rhythm of the brain and origin of trauma. If we do not access directly the circuits of that fear, trauma will be tremendously resistant to treatment. Our goal, in this case, with NFB is to increase the brain’s “window of tolerance” when facing stress. In this way, we get a mature brain ready for psychological intervention with appropriate therapies for trauma treatment.

Twenty years of experience combining neurofeedback training with other regulations means like mindfulness have proved to be the perfect ground preparation for a further trauma body centered therapy like EMDR.

Bessel A. Van der Kolk with his study on EEG neurofeedback training (NF), in patients with chronic PTSD to explore the capacity of NF to reduce PTSD symptoms and increase affect regulation capacities. And Sebern Fisher with her book: Neurofeedback in the Treatment of Developmental Trauma: Calming the Fear-Driven Brain, give detailed example in how neurofeedback regulation facilitates the path to severe trauma recovery. Optimizing brain’s response to trauma triggers is the best way to psychotherapy to approach sever trauma injures.

2020: Neurofeedback Regulation for Trauma Treatment (Plenary)
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