2020: Creating an Individualized Z-Score Database for Assessment and Live Z-Score Training

Presented by Jeff Tarrant: To date, EEG mapping for assessment has been typically done using population-static z-scores, and EEG neurofeedback using live z-scores has used population-dynamic z-scores. In both cases, population means and standard deviations are being used as the references. This raises fundamental concerns when it is recognized that individuals are unique, and using a population-based statistic has the undesirable result of causing every subject to be compared to a group, raising concerns about the validity of these measurements.

This workshop describes and briefly characterizes a method for computing quantitative EEG (QEEG) z-scores based on a modification of the typical methods used for QEEG reporting. In particular, it describes using a sample of EEG from a single individual, and creating a reference database from the individual sample. The goal of this method is to quantify and localize within-subject changes, providing the ability to compare an individual to themselves at a different point in time. The resultant z-scores of this comparison provide a concrete measure of any significant changes from time 1 to time 2. These measurements can be calculated for all frequency bands, at all scalp locations, sLORETA voxels, and sLORETA Regions of Interest (ROI’s). In addition, this information can be displayed on a 3D brain image, allowing the user to visualize the changes.

We refer to this approach as “z-builder,†because the z-score reference is constructed or “built†on a per-subject basis in the office or laboratory, and is not derived from a reference obtained from an outside source. This individual database can be used to examine state changes as a result of time, medications, or some other intervention. The individual database can also be used in z-score neurofeedback to train an individual toward a desired state which has been previously recorded.

In this workshop, we will present preliminary evidence that this approach is valid and statistically sound. We will present a variety of case studies that demonstrate the stability of individual EEG scores in the absence of intervention, as well as changes resulting from meditative states, vibroacoustic stimulation, virtual reality, and microdosing psilocybin. In addition, we will discuss the process of using z-builder neurofeedback applications for achieving specific peak states or improved cognitive functioning.

Category:

$60.00

Presented by Jeff Tarrant: To date, EEG mapping for assessment has been typically done using population-static z-scores, and EEG neurofeedback using live z-scores has used population-dynamic z-scores. In both cases, population means and standard deviations are being used as the references. This raises fundamental concerns when it is recognized that individuals are unique, and using a population-based statistic has the undesirable result of causing every subject to be compared to a group, raising concerns about the validity of these measurements.

This workshop describes and briefly characterizes a method for computing quantitative EEG (QEEG) z-scores based on a modification of the typical methods used for QEEG reporting. In particular, it describes using a sample of EEG from a single individual, and creating a reference database from the individual sample. The goal of this method is to quantify and localize within-subject changes, providing the ability to compare an individual to themselves at a different point in time. The resultant z-scores of this comparison provide a concrete measure of any significant changes from time 1 to time 2. These measurements can be calculated for all frequency bands, at all scalp locations, sLORETA voxels, and sLORETA Regions of Interest (ROI’s). In addition, this information can be displayed on a 3D brain image, allowing the user to visualize the changes.

We refer to this approach as “z-builder,†because the z-score reference is constructed or “built†on a per-subject basis in the office or laboratory, and is not derived from a reference obtained from an outside source. This individual database can be used to examine state changes as a result of time, medications, or some other intervention. The individual database can also be used in z-score neurofeedback to train an individual toward a desired state which has been previously recorded.

In this workshop, we will present preliminary evidence that this approach is valid and statistically sound. We will present a variety of case studies that demonstrate the stability of individual EEG scores in the absence of intervention, as well as changes resulting from meditative states, vibroacoustic stimulation, virtual reality, and microdosing psilocybin. In addition, we will discuss the process of using z-builder neurofeedback applications for achieving specific peak states or improved cognitive functioning.

We’ve Moved…

To accommodate the organization’s growing needs, we have decided to move our office to a new location.

2146 Roswell Road

Suite 108, PMB 736

Marietta, GA 30062

USA

2020: Creating an Individualized Z-Score Database for Assessment and Live Z-Score Training
Scroll to Top

Are you having problems clicking next on the membership form?

You must have 3rd party cookies set to “Always Accept.”

Internet Explorer 7 on Windows

  • Click the “Tools” menu
  • Click “Internet Options”
  • Select the “Privacy” tab
  • Option 1: To enable third-party cookies for all sites
  • Click “Advanced”
  • Select “Override automatic cookie handling”
  • Select the “Accept” button under “Third-party Cookies” and click “OK”

Firefox 3 on Windows

  • Click the “Tools” menu
  • Click “Options…”
  • Select the “Privacy” menu
  • Make sure “Keep until” is set to “they expire”
  • Option 1: To enable third party cookies for ALL sites: Make sure “Accept third-party cookies” is checked

Safari on Apple OS X:

  • Click the “Safari” menu
  • Click “Preferences…”
  • Click the “Security” menu
  • For “Cookies and website data” unselect “Block all cookies”
  • For “Website tracking”, unselect “Prevent cross-site tracking”
Safari enable cookies for membership purchase.

Firefox 3 on Apple OS X:

  • Click the “Firefox” menu
  • Click Preferences…
  • Click the Privacy menu
  • Make sure “Keep until” is set to “they expire”
  • Option 1: To enable third-party cookies for ALL sites: Make sure “Accept third-party cookies” is checked

Google Chrome on Windows

  • Select the Wrench (spanner) icon at the top right
  • Select “Options”
  • Select the “Under the Hood” tab
  • Select “Allow all cookies” under “Cookie Settings” and click “Close”

Internet Explorer 6 on Windows

  • Click the “Tools” menu
  • Click “Internet Options”
  • Select the “Privacy” tab
  • Move the settings slider to “Low” or “Accept all cookies”
  • Click “OK”

Opera 9 on Windows

  • Click the “Tools” menu
  • Click “Preferences…”
  • Click the “Advanced” tab
  • Select “Cookies” on the left list
  • Make sure “Accept cookies” is selected and uncheck “Delete new cookies when exiting Opera”
  • Click “OK”